FPR Blog

Social & Affective Neuroscience Society 2019 Program

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Click here to view the full program of the SANS 2019 Annual Meeting…

FPR-McGill 2019 Summer Workshop in Social & Cultural Neuroscience (June 17–21)

The following CMB members are presenting at this Summer's workshop:…

FPR Sex/Gender Conference Summary: Part 3 – What Counts as Adequate Function?

The sex/gender conference succeeded in bringing together people…

FPR Sex/Gender Conference Summary: Part 2 – What's Fixed, Changing, Changeable

Part 2 of the FPR-UCLA conference on sex/gender, which was chaired…

FPR Sex/Gender Conference Summary: Part I – Why Now?

Emerging theories in neuroscience – fueled by new technologies…

A Must-Read: Nature Special Issue on Interdisciplinarity

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This Fall, the FPR is celebrating fifteen years of interdisciplinary…

DSM-5 on Culture: A Significant Advance

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[A]ll forms of distress are locally shaped, including the DSM…

Book Review: Liah Greenfeld's Mind, Modernity, Madness

According to Liah Greenfeld, author of Mind, Modernity, Madness, “culture is an empirical reality of the first order in human life – that it, in the most profound sense of the word makes us human and defines human experience.”

Toward an Anthropological Theory of Mind: Introduction

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In October 2011, a small, international gathering of twenty-seven anthropologists and psychologists took place at the Stanford Humanities Center, organized by Stanford anthropology professor Tanya Luhrmann and Culture and Mind postdoctoral fellows Julia Cassaniti, and Jocelyn Marrow.

Toward an Anthropological Theory of Mind: Selves

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The session on “selves” in many ways revisited some classic questions in psychological anthropology: “To what extent are selves culturally constituted? If selves are only partially constituted by culture, what other factors play a part in their makeup?