FPR Blog

FPR Sex/Gender Conference Summary: Part 3 – What Counts as Adequate Function?

The sex/gender conference succeeded in bringing together people…

FPR Sex/Gender Conference Summary: Part 2 – What’s Fixed, Changing, Changeable

Part 2 of the FPR-UCLA conference on sex/gender, which was chaired…

FPR Sex/Gender Conference Summary: Part I – Why Now?

Emerging theories in neuroscience – fueled by new technologies…

A Must-Read: Nature Special Issue on Interdisciplinarity

This Fall, the FPR is celebrating fifteen years of interdisciplinary…

Conference Speaker Tom Boellstorff’s Virtual-World Research Featured on the Drax Files

"To call the physical world 'real life' is the number-one problem…

DSM-5 on Culture: A Significant Advance

[A]ll forms of distress are locally shaped, including the DSM…

Book Review: Liah Greenfeld’s Mind, Modernity, Madness

According to Liah Greenfeld, author of Mind, Modernity, Madness, “culture is an empirical reality of the first order in human life – that it, in the most profound sense of the word makes us human and defines human experience.”

Toward an Anthropological Theory of Mind: Introduction

In October 2011, a small, international gathering of twenty-seven anthropologists and psychologists took place at the Stanford Humanities Center, organized by Stanford anthropology professor Tanya Luhrmann and Culture and Mind postdoctoral fellows Julia Cassaniti, and Jocelyn Marrow.

Toward an Anthropological Theory of Mind: Selves

The session on “selves” in many ways revisited some classic questions in psychological anthropology: “To what extent are selves culturally constituted? If selves are only partially constituted by culture, what other factors play a part in their makeup?

CBDMH Psychosis Workshop Summary, Pt. 2

Today’s talk, which was richly illustrated with film clips from his documentary series Afflictions, focused on three areas: diagnosis and healing, illness experience, and outcome (see also Lemelson & Tucker, in press-a; and Lemelson & Tucker, in press-b, for more on the making of Afflictions).

CBDMH Psychosis Workshop Summary, Pt. 1

Last weekend, the FPR-CBDMH program held its inaugural winter workshop for CBDMH students and affiliated faculty at UCLA, bringing together an informal group to share research and perspectives on a topic of general interest: “Rethinking Psychosis: Culture, Brain, and Context.”

Is Schizophrenia a Network Disorder? Researchers Weigh in …

This is just a brief note that Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience…

A Very Brief Introduction: Resting-State Brain Connectivity

Some of the speakers at our forthcoming winter workshop on psychosis…

Lessons from Ten Years of Mixed Methods Graduate Training at UCLA

In May 2012 I attended the 10th reunion of the the FPR-UCLA Center for Culture,…